Great and Little Domesday

Domesday Book
Selected St Edmundsbury Towns and Vills

SELECTED TOWN OR VILLAGE
Bury St Edmunds
Brandon
Cavendish
Clare
Culford
Elveden
Flempton
Fornham All Saints
Fornham St Genevieve
Fornham St Martin
Great Barton
Haverhill
Horringer
Icklingham, part 1
Icklingham, part 2
Ingham
Lackford
Lakenheath
Long Melford
Mildenhall
Stanton
West Stow
Colophon or ending

Introduction to the format of this section
The entries for our towns and villages shown in this Domesday section have been extracted and re-arranged for the convenience of users of this chronicle, who will probably be interested in their own locality's history rather than in the wealth of former landlords. All the entries for each vill shown below have been brought together, whereas in Domesday they were scattered under the entries for each individual landlord.

The landholder number and land parcel number used in the Phillimore edition of the Domesday Book for Suffolk have been retained as an aid to cross referencing to that written text.

The translated entries shown are also deliberately laid out differently from the original for clarity. The original entries were in one continous line of text, and contained many abbreviations, which are shown here in extended and translated form. It is possible that some abbreviations have been mistaken by modern translators in one or two places.

Most of our modern day villages have entries in Domesday, but do not equate exactly to modern boundaries. Contemporaries might have recognised these as names of "vills", rather than villages. A vill might roughly coincide with our own ideas of a parish area, rather than just the built up part of the village sharing the parish name. Only a selection of vills are shown here. Towns, as we know them, are not usually acknowledged seperately within the Domesday Book, and Bury St Edmunds itself is a glaring anomoly in this regard.


Phillimore edition - entry for Bury

Bury St Edmunds (Sancti Edmvndi)
Landlord 14 was the Abbey of St Edmunds or Terra Sci.Edmvndi, as the book has it.
Entry 167 was the last entry for 'lands of St Edmunds'.

Please note that the town of Bury was not included under Thingoe Hundred (Chinhoge) which covered entries 1 to 17. Neither was Bury recorded as a borough at this time. G. H. Martin has commented that "Ironically enough, the fullest account of the internal business of a town occurs under Bury St Edmunds, with its brewers, tailors, laundresses, porters, and general dealers, which is not explicitly described as a borough."....... (The) "St Edmund's... monks gave the commissioners a more extended account of their estates than the occasion demanded: the object was to survey the king's rights and other men's resources as they affected the king, not to depict the life of boroughs or of any other institutions."

However, it could also be said that, in some cases, the monks provided less information than was demanded. There is no mention of the numbers of ploughs, oxen, sheep or other livestock which is commonly seen in other vill entries. There is no church mentioned, and no church endowment.

You can see a facsimile of the 1783 transcription by clicking on the small picture to the left of this text, together with the translation, which is also reproduced below.

Translation of entry for 'Lands of St Edmund'

SUF 14,167
In the town where St Edmund the glorious King and Martyr lies buried, Abbot Baldwin held 118 men before 1066 for the monks' supplies.
They could grant and sell their land.
Under them, 52 smallholders from whom the Abbot could have a certain amount of aid.
54 free men, somewhat poor;
43 almsmen; each of them has 1 smallholder.
Now 2 mills; 2 ponds or fish ponds.
Value of this town then £10; now £20.
It has 1½ leagues in length and as much in width.
When the Hundred pays £1 in tax, then 60d goes from here for the monks' supplies;
but this is from the town as it was before 1066 and yet it is the same now although it is enclosed in a larger circuit of land which then was ploughed and sown but where now there are 30 priests, deacons and clerics, and 28 nuns and poor persons, who pray daily for the King and all Christian people.
Also 75 bakers, brewers, tailors, washers, shoemakers, robemakers, cooks, porters, bursars; all these daily serve St Edmund's, the Abbot and the brethren.
Besides these, there are 13 reeves in charge of the land who have their houses in the same town;

Alternative translation by Domesdaytextbase: "Besides these, there are 13 [men] on the reeve's land who have their houses in the same town;"

under them, 5 smallholders.
Also now 34 men-at-arms, including French and English; under them, 22 smallholders.
Now in all there are 342 houses in lordship on land which was St Edmund's arable before 1066.

Cavendish (Ranavadisc, Rana avdsc, Kavanadisc)
Landholder 25 was Richard, Son of Count Gilbert. Richard de Clare was a substantial landowner in Suffolk with 112 entries. Domesday reference number 47 referred to Cavendish.

Richard de Clare also had lands in Kent, where he was known as Richard of Tonbridge. His father was Count Gilbert of Brionne. Cavendish was in the Babergh Two Hundreds. The Saxon lord before him in 1066 was Withgar, "the same man" referred to in entry 47.

SUF 25,47
In Cavendish 9 free men under the patronage and full jurisdiction of the same man; 3 carucates of land.
5 smallholders, 1 slave.
3 ploughs.
Meadow, 14 acres. 4 cattle, 1 horse; now 15 pigs; 46 sheep.
Value £3.
Roger of St Germain holds this.

Landholder 43 was Ralph of Limésy, a Norman from the Seine Inferior province of France. Section 43 entry 2 refers to a part of Cavendish previously held by Norman. The name Norman appears in many places in Domesday Book, sometimes as Norman the Sheriff.

SUF 43,2
Norman held Cavendish, with full jurisdiction, under King Edward; as a manor, 2 carucates of land.
A church with 30 acres of free land.
Always 5 villagers; 8 smallholders; 7 slaves.
Then 2 ploughs in lordship, later and now 4; always 3 men's ploughs.
1 mill; meadow, 10 acres. Then 3 cattle, now 24; then 40 sheep, now 110 then 30 pigs, now 50. To this manor belongs 1 outlier, Coddenham, with 2 carucates of land. Then 5 villagers; later and now 3; then 4 smallholders, later and now 13; then and later 2 slaves, now 1.
Then 2 ploughs in lordship, later and now 1; 1½ men's ploughs. Then ½ mill, later and now none.
A church with 20 acres of free land.
Value of the whole then and later 100s; now £10.
Cavendish has ½ league in length and 4 furlongs in width; 10d in tax. Coddenham has 6 furlongs in length and 3 in width; 3½d in tax.

Suffolk Section 76: Lands in Dispute

This section summarises those areas of dispute, where the King had not made a grant to any of his Barons, but nevertheless, they had "annexed" the rights.
Cavendish appears under entries 76,3; 76,6; 76,7 and 76,20.
All of the first 7 entries were annexations by Richard de Clare, son of Count Gilbert. Entry 20 was an annexation by Ralph de Limésy. As only 23 annexations were listed in total for Suffolk, it is odd that 17% of them were in Cavendish.

SUF 76,3
In Cavendish Aelfric Brother of Edric, a man of the said Withgar's, annexed a half of his brother's land; 60 acres. Now Roger of St Germain holds it in Richard's Holding, but it never belonged to the Holding, nor did the patronage or the jurisdiction.
There has always been 1 villager and 1 smallholder.
Meadow, 1 acre.

SUF 76,6
In Cavendish Alwold, 1 free man under the patronage and full jurisdiction of Harold before 1066, and after King William came. Now Richard has annexed him. He has 1 carucate of land. Always 1½ ploughs.
Meadow, 2 acres.
Value 20s.

SUF 76,7
In the same Cavendish Richard of Clare annexed a free man of King Edward's, but his predecessor had nothing at all in relation to him. He has 1 carucate of land.
Then 4 villagers, later and now 2; 7 smallholders.
Then and later 2 ploughs, now 1; 1 men's plough.
Meadow, 4 acres; now 1 mill; woodland, 10 pigs.
Value 20s.

SUF 76,20
In Cavendish Ralph of Limésy holds; 1 free man of Harold's, Edric the deacon, who died with him in battle, held it. It was delivered to Baynard as an estate. Edgar added it to Cavendish after Baynard lost it. Ralph of Limésy now holds it in lordship.

Clare (Clara)
Landholder 25 was Richard de Clare, son of Count Gilbert. Richard also held lands outside Suffolk, notably in Kent where he was called Richard of Tonbridge.
The Honour of Clare would become a large and powerful holding.
Of the 112 entries for Suffolk, Clare itself was number 1 and was the administrative centre of the Honour.

Risbridge Hundred
SUF 25,1
Aelfric held Clare as a manor; 24 carucates of land before 1066. Then 40 villagers, later 35, now 30; then and later 10 smallholders; now 30; always 20 slaves.
Then 12 ploughs in lordship, later 6, now 7; then 36 men's ploughs, later 30, now 24.
Meadow, 37 acres; woodland at 12 pigs; always 1 mill, now 5 arpents of vines. Always 6 cobs.
Then 10 cattle, now 14; then 12 pigs, now 60; then 60 sheep, now 480, 12 beehives.
Always 1 market; now 43 burgesses.
Aelfric son of Withgar gave this manor to St John's before 1066 with the assent of his son and placed therein a certain Ledmer the priest and others with him. When a charter had been made, he committed the Church and the whole place to the custody of Abbot Leofstan and into the protection of his son Withgar. The clerics could not grant this land or alienate it from St John's. But after King William came, he took possession of it into his own hand.
To this manor have always belonged 5 freemen with every customary due; 1½ carucates of land. Always 1½ ploughs.
Meadow, 6 acres.
Value then £40; now the same.
It has 2 leagues in length and 1 in width; 15d in tax.

Ingham (Ingham)
SUF 14,69
`BRADEMERE' Hundred
Before 1066 a certain man-at-arms of St Edmund's, Wulfwy, held INGHAM from it as a manor.
Now St [Edmund's] itself holds it.
3 carucates of land; a fourth carucate of land lies in another Hundred.
Always 1 villager; 2 smallholders.
Then 3 ploughs in lordship, now 4; always 1 men's plough.
Then 3 slaves, now 9;
meadow, 27 acres;
1 mill.
Now 4 cobs
now 19 cattle;
now 30 pigs, 520 sheep.
21 Freemen with 1 carucate of land. Always 7 ploughs.
Meadow, 2 acres.
These [Freemen] all belong to St [Edmund's] with full jurisdiction and every customary due, and [they belong] to the fold.
Nor could they ever grant or sell without the Abbot's permission.
A church, 24 acres of free land in alms.
Value of this manor then £4; now [£]8.
It has 16 furlongs in length and 8 in width;
16d in tax, but the King holds there.
Culford (Culeforda)
SUF 14,70
`BRADEMERE' Hundred
St Edmund's held CULFORD before 1066 as a manor; 1 carucate of land.
Always 2 villagers; 2 smallholders.
Always 1 plough in lordship. Then 1 men's plough, now 1/2.
Meadow, 8 acres. 1 cattle, 2 pigs, 85 sheep.
18 Freemen with 1/2 carucate of land. Always 2 ploughs.
These [Freemen] also belonged to St [Edmund's] with full jurisdiction and every customary due; they could not grant or sell without the Abbot's permission.
Value then £4; now [£]3.
In the same [Culford] 1 free man with 1 carucate of land. Peter [ the steward ] holds it from the Abbot.
7 smallholders; 2 slaves.
Always 2 ploughs [in lordship]; 2 men's oxen. Meadow, 6 acres.
Value then 10s; now 30[s].
It has 1 league in length and 5 furlongs in width; 7 1/4d in tax.
Haverhill (Hauerhol, hauerhella)
Haverhill appears under four landholding sections.
Landholder 14 was the Abbey of St Edmund.
Number 16 was the Bishop of Bayeux, a very significant man called Odo, who was half brother to King William the Conqueror. He had run the country for periods while William was abroad, but from 1082 to 1087 was in prison. He had 48 entries in the Suffolk part of the Domesday Book.
In Haverhill his lands were held by Tihel de Helléan who appears in his own right as Landholder 42 with a holding in Haverhill.
Three entries exist for Richard de Clare in Haverhill.

Landholder 14, the Abbey of St Edmund, Entry number 160.
SUF 14,160
In Haverhill 2 free men; 5 acres.
Value 7d.
St Edmund's has the jurisdiction and patronage.

Landholder 16, the Bishop of Bayeux, entry 1.
Risbridge Hundred.
SUF 16,1
In Haverhill 1 free man; 24 acres. ½ plough.
Value 3s.
Tihel holds this from the Bishop. His predecessor before 1066 had the patronage; St Edmund's had the 6 forfeitures.

Landholder 25, Richard, Son of Count Gilbert, entries 82, 95, 102.
SUF 25,82
In Haverhill Fridebern, 1 free man, held 5 smallholders; they have 80 acres. 1 plough in lordship; 2 men's oxen. Meadow, 2 acres. Value then 13s 4d; now 15s. Payne also holds this.

SUF 25,95
In Haverhill always 13 free men; 1 carucate of land and 60 acres. 1½ ploughs. Woodland, 7 pigs.
Value 30s.

SUF 25,102
In Haverhill 2 free men; 26 acres.
Value 4½s.
All these free men could sell and grant their lands but Withgar had full jurisdiction before 1066, except for the 6 forfeitures of St Edmund's, as we said above.

Landholder 42, Tihel de Helléan, entry 2.
Tihel of Helléan was also known as Tihel the Breton. His name survives at Helions Bumpstead in Essex where he also held land. Parts of Haverhill which today are in Suffolk would have been in Essex in 1086.

Risbridge Hundred
SUF 42,2
Clarenbold held Haverhill before 1066 as a manor;
2½ carucates of land.
Then and later 6 villagers; now 1;
then and later 4 smallholders; now 10;
always 10 slaves.
Then and later and always 2 ploughs in lordship;
then and later 1 men's plough, now ½.
Woodland at 20 pigs,
meadow, 6 acres;
the third part of a market,
in it 10 smallholders.
5 acres, belonging to the church.
Value of the manor 40s;
value of the market 13s 4d.
It has 1 league in length and 1½ in width;
6d in tax.
Others hold there.

Great Barton
SUF 14,48
THEDWASTRE Hundred
St Edmund's held [Great] BARTON before 1066 as a manor;
5 carucates of land.
Always 22 villagers; 5 smallholders.
Then 4 ploughs in lordship, now 3; always 6 men's ploughs.
Then 11 slaves, now 4. Meadow, 3 acres; woodland, 4 pigs.
4 cobs, 18 cattle, 44 pigs, 402 sheep; now 2 beehives.
70 free [men]; 5 carucates of land. Always 18 ploughs between them all.
2 smallholders.
Meadow, 1 acre.
Over these men, [St Edmund's] has and always had full jurisdiction and every customary due. They all belong to the fold except for 3.
50 acres of free land belong to the church of this village as alms. Value then £16; now [£]20.
It has 1 league 2 furlongs in length, and 1 league in width;
27d in tax.
Fornham St Martin (Fornha)
SUF 14,50
St Edmund's held FORNHAM [St Martin] before 1066 as a manor;
1 carucate of land.
Always 3 villagers; 4 smallholders.
Then 1 plough in lordship, now 2; always 2 men's ploughs.
Then 4 slaves, now 3.
2 cobs; always 4 cattle.
Now 12 pigs; 80 sheep.
10 free men, 6 smallholders; 30 acres of land. Always 1 plough.
These also belong entirely to St [Edmund's] with every customary due and [belong] to the fold.
In the same [Fornham St Martin] 1 free man with 12 acres of land.
He could grant and sell the land; the full jurisdiction however and patronage still belonged to St [Edmund's].
16 acres of free land belong to the church of this village in alms.
Value of this manor before 1066, £3; now [£]4.
It has 9 furlongs in length and 7 in width;
6 1/2d in tax.
Fornham All Saints (Fornham)
SUF 14,9
St Edmund's held FORNHAM [All Saints] as a manor before 1066;
1 carucate of land.
Always 4 smallholders.
Always 1 plough in lordship; always 1 men's plough.
Always 1 slave.
Meadow, 4 acres;
1 mill.
Always 2 cobs, 14 cattle, 30 pigs, 60 sheep.
3 Freemen with 30 acres of land. Always 1/2 plough.
These [Freeman] are St [Edmund's] with full jurisdiction and patronage and every customary due. They could not grant or sell the land without permission.
In the same [Fornham [All Saints]] 2 free men with 1 1/2 carucates of land.
1 villager; 3 smallholders.
Always 2 ploughs.
They could grant and sell the land, but the full jurisdiction and patronage still belonged to St [Edmund's].
Value always 40s.
A church, 12 acres of free land.
Value of this manor, except for the free [men], always 40s.
It has 8 furlongs in length and 5 in width;
10d in tax.
Fornham St Genevieve (Genonefae forha)
SUF 14,53
St Edmund's held FORNHAM St Genevieve before 1066 as an outlier;
2 carucates of land. Peter [the steward] has 40 acres of these 2 carucates; he holds [them] from the Abbot.
2 villagers [and] 2 smallholders have 1 of these carucates;
the hall to which it belongs is in another Hundred.
Ralph holds from the Abbot 12 acres of these 2 carucates.
Always 8 villagers; 3 smallholders.
Always 2 ploughs in lordship; 3 men's ploughs.
Always 3 slaves. Meadow, 4 acres; always 3 mills. 1 cob, 100 sheep.
6 free men, 1 villager, 5 smallholders;
1 carucate of land.
Always 3 ploughs.
These could grant and sell their lands,
but jurisdiction over the land, and service, still belonged to St [Edmund's].
Value 10s.
A church with 14 acres of free land as alms.
Value of this outlier, always £4.
It has 9 furlongs in length and 4 in width;
8d in tax.
West Stow (Stowa)
`BRADEMERE' Hundred
SUF 14,71
In [West] STOW 21 free men with 2 carucates of land.
Always 6 ploughs between them all.
Meadow, 2 acres.
These [free men] belong to St [Edmund's] with full jurisdiction and every customary due; they do service in Lackford.
Value always 20s.
In the same [West Stow] 1 free man with 1/2 carucate of land. Always 1 plough.
Value always 4s.
A church with 12 acres of free land in alms. It lies in another Hundred.
It has 9 furlongs in length and 7 in width;
17d in tax.
Horringer (Horningasworde)
SUF 14,2
St Edmund's held HORRINGER as a manor before 1066; 4 carucates of land.
Always 3 villagers; 15 smallholders.
Always 4 ploughs in lordship; always 5 men's ploughs.
Always 7 slaves.
Meadow, 3 acres; woodland, 5 pigs. Now 5 cobs; now 14 cattle, 30 pigs, 45 sheep.
15 Freemen with 1 carucate of land.
1 smallholder.
Always 4 ploughs.
These [Freemen] are St [Edmund's] with full jurisdiction and with every customary due. They could not grant or sell the land without the Abbot's permission.
A church with 6 acres of free land.
Value of this manor then £6; now [£]8.
It has 9 furlongs in length and 8 in width;
20d in tax.
Another holds there.

SUF 25,29
(Lands of Richard son of Count Gilbert)

In HORRINGER 1 Freeman of the same man's [Wihtgar's], with 20 acres.
2 smallholders.
Always 1 plough.
Value 4s.

Stanton
SUF 14,72
BLACKBURN Hundred
St Edmund's held STANTON before 1066 as a manor;
1 carucate of land.
Then 1 plough in lordship, now 2.
Then 4 slaves, now 3;
meadow, 2 acres;
woodland, 8 pigs.
Now 2 cobs, 3 cattle, 28 pigs, 52 sheep, 30 goats.
60 Freemen with 2 carucates of land. Always 5 ploughs.
Meadow, 4 acres.
These [Freemen] belong and belonged to St [Edmund's] with patronage, full jurisdiction, and every customary due. Nor could they ever grant or sell their land without the Abbot's permission. And [they belong] to the fold.
Value of this manor then £6; now £6.
In the same [Stanton] 7 free men with 1 carucate and 30 acres of land. Always 4 ploughs.
Meadow, 4 acres; woodland at 10 pigs.
These [free men] could grant and sell their land, but the patronage and jurisdiction still belonged to St [Edmund's], and the service.
A church with 28 acres, and the fourth part of a church with 7 acres of land.
Value then 10s; now 13s.
It has 1 league in length and 6 furlongs in width;
2s 10 1/2d in tax.

SUF 6,301
In STANTON Walter of Caen holds from Robert Malet 1 free man, over whom his predecessor [Edric of Laxfield] had half the patronage and [the Abbey of] St Edmund's [had] half the patronage and full jurisdiction;
it has 90 acres.
3 smallholders.
Meadow, 4 acres.
Always 1 plough.
Under him, 1 free man; 10 acres; Walter also holds [this].
A church, 4 acres.
Value of the whole, 16s.
[Lands of Robert Malet]

SUF 76,8
Hundred of BLACKBURN
In STANTON 1 free woman under the patronage of [the Abbey of] St Edmund's before 1066;
30 acres. Value 5s.
[William of Parthenay annexed the whole of this in the Abbot's despite]
[This entry comes under the heading of "Annexations of William of Parthenay"]

Mildenhall
SUF 25,39
Lands of Richard son of Count Gilbert

In MILDENHALL 2 Freemen with 60 acres.
1 smallholder.
Always 2 ploughs.
Value 5s.
It belongs in [the lands of] Desning. They could not sell.
[Wihtgar held this]

SUF 1,115
LACKFORD Hundred
[Lands of Archbishop Stigand which William of Noyers keeps in King William's hand]

King Edward gave MILDENHALL to [the Abbey of] St Edmund's;
later [Archbishop] Stigand held [it] in King Edward's lifetime under St Edmund's as a manor; 12 carucates of land.
Then and later 30 villagers, now 33; then 8 smallholders, later and now 15; always 16 slaves.
Always 6 ploughs in lordship; 8 men's ploughs. Meadow, 20 acres.
A church, 40 acres.
1 mill; 3 1/2 fisheries. 31 wild mares, 37 cattle, 60 pigs, 1000 sheep.
8 Freemen; 30 acres. Always 1/2 plough.

1 outlier, ICKLINGHAM, belongs to this;
6 carucates of land.
Then 6 villagers, now 4; then 7 smallholders, now 5; always 8 slaves.
Always 3 ploughs in lordship; then 4 men's ploughs, later and now 2.
1 mill.
A church, 24 acres.
2 cobs, 3 cattle, 4 pigs, 500 sheep.
1 Freeman there, with 30 acres. Always 1 plough.

Value of the whole, then and later £40; now £70 at face value.
This village (Mildenhall?) has 1 league in length and 1 league in width; 11 1/4d in tax. Several hold there.
The above outlier [Icklingham] has 2 1/2 leagues in length and the same in width; 11 1/4d in tax.

Icklingham
SUF 34,1
Lands of Ranulf Peverel
LACKFORD Hundred

In ICKLINGHAM Siward of Maldon held under King Edward, but the full jurisdiction [was the Abbey of] St Edmund's;
3 carucates of land as a manor.
Always 6 villagers. Then 2 smallholders, now 1;
then and later 4 slaves, now 3.
Always 3 ploughs in lordship; 2 men's ploughs.
1 mill. Then 1 horse, now none; then 3 cattle, now 2;
then 30 pigs, now 21; then 250 sheep, now 350.
Value then and later £4; now 100s.
[The Abbey of] St Edmund's [has] the jurisdiction.

SUF 53,1
Lands of Eudo son of Spirewic
LACKFORD Hundred

In ICKLINGHAM Morvan holds from Eudo what Anund, a free man, held under St Etheldreda's [of Ely] before 1066 as a manor;
2 carucates of land. But he could not sell.
Now Eudo son of Spirewic holds [it]; from Heinfrid, his predecessor.
But the full jurisdiction [is] [the Abbey of] St Edmund's.
Then and later 7 villagers, now 6;
6 smallholders; 1 slave.
Always 2 ploughs in lordship; 1 men's plough.
Meadow, 5 acres;
1 mill.
Now 84 sheep.
Value then £4; now 60s.

Brandon
SUF 21,5
Lands of St Etheldreda's of Ely
LACKFORD Hundred

St Etheldreda's held BRANDON before 1066, and now, as a manor;
5 carucates of land.
Always 8 villagers; 4 smallholders; 7 slaves.
Always 3 ploughs in lordship. Then 4 men's ploughs, now 3.
Meadow, [3] acres; 1 fishery. 2 asses, 11 cattle, 200 sheep, 20 pigs.
A church, 30 acres.
Value then £6; now [£]8.
It has 1 league in length and 1/2 in width;
20d in tax.

SUF 28,2
Lands of Eudo the steward

In LAKENHEATH and in BRANDON 6 Freemen of [St] Etheldreda's [of Ely] with the jurisdiction [who] could not sell.
They were delivered to Lisois [of Moutiers], Eudo's predecessor, for 2 carucates of land; but nevertheless, later on they were acknowledged [to be] St Etheldreda's.
Eudo held them with full jurisdiction.
4 smallholders.
Always 3 ploughs.
Meadow, 3 acres; 2 fisheries.
Value then and later 30s; now it pays 70s.

Lakenheath (and Undley)
SUF 21,6
Lands of St Etheldreda's of Ely
LACKFORD Hundred

St Etheldreda's held LAKENHEATH before 1066 as a manor;
3 carucates of land.
Always 6 villagers; 5 smallholders; 4 slaves.
Then 3 ploughs in lordship, now 2; always 2 men's ploughs.
Meadow, 5 acres; 1/2 mill; 2 fisheries. 2 horses at the hall, 5 cattle, 100 sheep, 17 pigs.
A church, 60 acres.
Value then £4; now [£]6.
It has 1 league in length and 1/2 in width;
20d in tax.

SUF 21,7
St Etheldreda's held UNDLEY;
1 carucate of land.
3 smallholders; 4 slaves.
Always 2 ploughs in lordship.
Meadow, 13 acres; 2 fisheries. 1 horse, 24 cattle, 62 sheep.
Value always 20s.
A church without land.
It has 2 furlongs in length and 2 in width.
Tax in Lakenheath.

SUF 25,36
Lands of Richard son of Count Gilbert

In LAKENHEATH 1 carucate of land.
8 villagers.
Then 1 plough in lordship, now 1 1/2.
4 fisheries in Ely; 1 fishing-boat;
meadow, 1 acre.
These 2 lands are [included] in the valuation of Desning.
[Wihtgar held it]

Lackford
SUF 14,7
Land of [the Abbey of] St Edmund's

St Edmund's held LACKFORD as a manor before 1066;
5 carucates of land.
Always 14 villagers; 7 smallholders.
Always 3 ploughs in lordship; always 4 men's ploughs.
Always 4 slaves. Meadow, 30 acres; 2 mills.
Now 2 cobs, 9 cattle, 13 pigs, 160 sheep.
1 Freeman with 8 acres of land. Always 2 oxen.
Over him, St [Edmund's] has full jurisdiction and patronage. He could not grant or sell the land without permission.
A church with 20 acres of free land.
Value of this manor then £6; now [£]8.
It has 1 league in length and 10 furlongs in width;
6d in tax.

(Also see references in West Stow (14,71) and Flempton (14,12)

Flempton
SUF 14,12
Land of [the Abbey of] St Edmund's

In FLEMPTON Wulfward holds from the Abbot 10 Freemen with 1 <358a> carucate of land.
6 smallholders.
Between them all, always 3 ploughs.
Meadow, 1 acre; 1 mill.
These [Freemen] belong to St [Edmund's], with full jurisdiction and patronage; they owe service in Risby, Lackford and Hengrave.
They could not grant or sell the land without the Abbot's permission.
Value always 40s.
A church with 8 acres of free land.
It has 6 furlongs in length and 4 in width;
6d in tax.

Elveden
SUF 5,3
Lands of Count Eustace
LACKFORD Hundred

In ELVEDEN Alsi held, later Engelric [the priest], now [Count] Eustace;
2 carucates of land as a manor.
Always 3 villagers; 3 smallholders;
2 slaves.
Then and later 2 ploughs in lordship, now 1; 1 men's plough.
The fourth part of a fishpond.
A church, 15 acres of land.
4 pigs, 150 sheep.
Value then 30s; now 40[s].

SUF 14,20
Land of [the Abbey of] St Edmund's

St Edmund's held ELVEDEN before 1066 as a manor;
2 carucates of land.
Always 4 villagers; 4 smallholders;
1 slave.
Then 2 ploughs in lordship, now 1; always 1 1/2 men's ploughs.
Now 2 cobs, 4 cattle, 12 pigs, 260 sheep, 13 goats.
The fourth part of a fishery.
A church, 15 acres of free land.
4 free men and a half with 1 carucate of land.
3 smallholders.
Then 3 ploughs, now 2.
These [free men] could grant and sell the land, but the full jurisdiction, patronage and service still belonged to St [Edmund's].
Value then 10s; now 15[s].
Value of this manor, except for the free [men], then 30s; now 40[s].
It has 1 league in length and likewise 1 league in width;
20d in tax.
Several hold there.
[ Wulfward of Wangford holds]

SUF 25,34
Lands of Richard son of Count Gilbert

Leofgeat, a free man only under the patronage of Wihtgar before 1066 [but] in the jurisdiction of [the Abbey of] St Edmund's, held ELVEDEN as a manor;
2 carucates of land.
Then 4 villagers, now 2. Always 3 smallholders; 1 slave.
Then 2 ploughs in lordship, later and now 1; 1/2 men's plough.
The fourth part of a fishery.
Always 1 horse; 12 pigs; 150 sheep.
Value then 30s; later and now the same.
A church, 15 acres of free land.

SUF 26,3
Lands of William of Warenne
LACKFORD Hundred

1 free man of St Etheldreda's [of Ely], under patronage only [but] in jurisdiction of [the Abbey of] St Edmund's, held in ELVEDEN;
2 carucates of land in exchange for Lewes.
Nicholas [of Kennett] holds [it] from William.
Then and later 4 villagers, now 3.
Always 2 smallholders; 1 slave.
Then and later 2 ploughs in lordship, now 1; always 1 men's plough.
The fourth part of a fishery.
1 church, 15 acres of land.
Then 4 pigs, now 2;
then 200 sheep, now 300;
then 50 goats, now 100 less 6.
Value then and later 30s; now 50s.

Long Melford
SUF 14,23
[In] BABERGH Two Hundreds

St Edmund held [Long] Melford TRE as a manor with 12 carucates of land.
Of this land Walter holds 40 acres from the abbot.
Then as now 37 villans.
Then 25 bordars and now 10.
Then 8 ploughs in demesne, now 6.
Then 20 ploughs belonging to the men, now 13.
Then as now 16 slaves.
50 acres of meadow.
Woodland for 60 pigs.
2 mills.
Now 3 horses.
Then as now 30 head of cattle. Now 300 sheep.
Then as now 140 pigs.
Now 12 [bee]hives.
40 wild horses now.
2 sokemen with 80 acres of land.
The same Walter held one from the abbot with 40 acres.
Then as now 2 ploughs.
Over these men St [Edmund] has commendation and sake and soke and every customary due and they could never give and sell their lands without the abbot's full consent.
A church with 2 carucates of land.
4 villans.
9 bordars.
Then as now 2 ploughs belonging to the church. Then as now 2 ploughs belonging to the men.
Then this manor was worth £20, now £30.
It is 18 furlongs long and 1 league broad.
In geld 20½d whoever holds [land] there.

Hundon
SUF 25,2
Lands of Richard son of Count Gilbert

Wihtgar [held it] before 1066 as a manor;
25 carucates of land and 20 acres.
Then and later 54 villagers, now 41.
Always 30 smallholders;
14 slaves.
Then 9 ploughs in lordship, later 4, now 7;
then 31 men's ploughs, later and now 23.
Meadow, 45 acres;
woodland at 160 pigs;
always 1 mill.
A church, 1/2 carucate of free land.
Another church, 4 1/2 acres.
Always 1 plough.
Meadow 3, acres.
Then 2 cobs, now 6;
then 14 cattle, now 31;
then 130 pigs, now 160;
then 80 sheep, now 480;
now 17 beehives.
Value then £30; later and now [£]40 4s.
It has 2 leagues and 2 furlongs in length, and 1 league in width;
15d in tax.
Others hold there.

SUF 25,12

In HUNDON 1 Freeman;
1 carucate of land.
Always 2 smallholders.
1 plough.
Haimo holds [this].
Then 30 sheep, now 50.
Value 20s.
In the same [Hundon] 10 Freemen;
1 carucate of land.
Always 1 plough.
Meadow, 2 acres.
Value 20s.
Wihtgar held these Freemen before 1066 with every customary due, except for the 6 forfeitures of Abbey of St Edmund's


The ending or "colophon"

Little Domesday ends as follows:

THIS SURVEY WAS MADE IN THE ONE THOUSAND AND EIGHTY SIXTH YEAR SINCE THE INCARNATION OF THE LORD,
AND IN THE TWENTIETH OF THE REIGN OF [KING] WILLIAM,
NOT ONLY THROUGH THESE THREE COUNTIES BUT ALSO THROUGH THE OTHERS.

SELECTED TOWN OR VILLAGE
Bury St Edmunds
Brandon
Cavendish
Clare
Culford
Elveden
Flempton
Fornham All Saints
Fornham St Genevieve
Fornham St Martin
Great Barton
Haverhill
Horringer
Icklingham, part 1
Icklingham, part 2
Ingham
Lackford
Lakenheath
Long Melford
Mildenhall
Stanton
West Stow

Prepared for the St Edmundsbury History Project
by David Addy, November 2009

Books consulted:
The Domesday Book - Facsimile with Translation, published by Phillimore Suffolk volume
Domesday Book textbase available online as Domesday Explorer
The Domesday Book Alecto version on CD-Rom: Essay by G. H. Martin on Boroughs


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